The International Information Center for Structural Engineers

The first 3D printed estate in the United States is set to be complete by the end of 2017. The ambitious project is being undertaken by New York City architect Adam Kushner, alongside partners including 3D-printing pioneer Enrico Dini and his D-Shape firm. The estate will feature a swimming pool, Jacuzzi, carport and a 2,400 square foot house in upstate New York.

Additional Info

  • Date occured Friday, 19 June 2015
Monday, 08 June 2015 00:00

Crane Drops A/C Unit 30 Stories

A heating and air-conditioning unit weighing several tons fell 30 stories to the ground last Sunday. The incident occurred in Midtown Manhattan after the unit came untethered from a crane lifting it to the roof of an office tower at 261 Madison Ave. Seven people were injured including 5 passers-by and two construction workers.

Additional Info

  • Date occured Monday, 08 June 2015

Construction has started on one of Manhattans newest skyscrapers. Located at 53 W. 53rd St. the MoMA Tower, designed by French architect Jean Nouvel, is to be completed sometime in 2018. Featuring a tapered profile with a roofline staggered across three irregular levels, the 1050-foot tall (82-storey) structure will house 139 apartments and is Nouvel’s first skyscraper in NYC. The tower will also have new public gallery spaces on the second, fourth and fifth floors, into which the neighboring Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) will expand its galleries.

Additional Info

  • Date occured Friday, 29 May 2015

Legislation introduced by New York City Councilman Donovan Richards (D-Queens) would prohibit the exterior and interior lighting at night for roughly 40,000 buildings. The bill is a part of the city’s plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 80 percent by 2050. Decreased lighting usage is of particular interest to meet this goal as 70 percent of New York’s carbon emissions come from buildings in the city. The bill states that a $1000 fine will be issued for non-compliance.

Published in Other News
Wednesday, 08 April 2015 04:44

Explosion in NYC Levels 3 Buildings

Around 250 firefighters responded last Thursday after a gas main leak caused an explosion that demolished three buildings in Manhattan’s East Village. 22 people were injured, four critically, and two people are thought to still be missing.

The explosion comes only a year after two buildings in Harlem collapsed after a gas leak last March, which killed eight and injured many more. The buildings were served by a 127-year-old gas main. Following the incident in 2014, industry experts warned that utilities in many parts of the U.S. were struggling to maintain or replace antiquated and leaky gas mains in older urban areas. Mains composed of cast iron or steel are the most vulnerable.

Wednesday, 03 September 2014 10:29

Work Stops on World’s Tallest Modular Tower

Skanska stopped work on the world’s tallest modular building last week over a dispute with the project’s developer Forest City Ratner. Skanska feels that the delays to the project have resulted from the modular designs for the buildings. They feel that Forest City Ratner should be held responsible for the cost overruns.  Richard Kennedy, co-chief operating officer of Skanska USA, told the Wall Street Journal, “it [the design] just doesn’t work the way it was sold to work. It was represented to be a complete and buildable modular design,” he said. “That simply was not the case and that’s what we’ve been struggling with.”  Forest City Ratner, however, stands by their design and believes the dispute is based on financial reasons.

Additional Info

  • Date occured Wednesday, 03 September 2014

Workers began drilling piles for the Tappan Zee Bridge in March. Since then, equipment has slowly accumulated on the Hudson River in New York to help build the bridge. Perhaps the most impressive piece of equipment arrived last week though when a barge-mounted concrete production factory arrived on site. The barge is one of a pair that will make 300,000 cubic yards of concrete for the new bridge span. The two barges are expected to reduce costs throughout the length of the project and also will likely make the project run smoother as the concrete will not need to be transported to the site. Workers will not have to worry about the concrete getting delayed due to traffic or road hazards. Had the decision been made to make the bridge’s concrete at a regular production factory, the Tappan Zee bridge project would have added 30,000 trucks to the road to transport the concrete throughout the duration of the project. The 60 foot by 200 foot barge is capable of producing 125 cubic yards of concrete per hour and can test the concrete in a laboratory located on the barge.

Additional Info

  • Date occured Wednesday, 23 July 2014

New York City officials unveiled an emergency housing unit prototype at a parking lot in Brooklyn on Tuesday. The prototype was developed in response to the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy. All available apartments in the city were rented shortly after the storm ended by people whose homes were damaged by the storm.  However there was not nearly enough vacant apartments to handle the demand and many people became sick of living in hotel rooms. Many New Yorkers had no other choice except to remain in their damaged, water-logged homes.

Additional Info

  • Date occured Tuesday, 10 June 2014
Tuesday, 03 June 2014 10:27

New York Tomorrow Skyscraper Proposal

New York Tomorrow, submitted by architects from the firm Fundamental, recently received runner-up honors in Metropolis Magazine’s Living Cities Competition.  The magazine’s competition is open to students and professionals and calls for proposals for multi-use residential towers for the 21st century. The building lot for New York Tomorrow is located on East 68th Street in New York City. The design overcomes the lot’s small site size (18 by 70 feet) by cantilevering the tower’s lobby out over a neighboring building. The design relies on revolutionary structural design technology and a unique multi-purpose space to draw in potential residents.

Additional Info

  • Date occured Tuesday, 03 June 2014

Amtrak CEO Joe Boardman recently stated that the two rail tunnels under the Hudson River in New York have less than 20 years left in their life expectancy before they need to be shut down. He states that he does not know the exact amount of time Amtrak has before the century-old tunnels need to close, but it could be less than 20 years. New tunnels will take approximately 7 to 9 years to complete once the project is officially agreed upon. Boardman would like to quickly resume planning for the multi-billion dollar tunnel replacements.

Additional Info

  • Date occured Friday, 09 May 2014
Page 2 of 4