The International Information Center for Structural Engineers

The bridge, which was expected to open in January 2019, was being built using a method called accelerated bridge construction

Thursday, 15 May 2014 12:00

Daytona Rising Project Making Progress

Daytona International Speedway is one the most famous racetracks in the world and prides itself on offering fans one of the best race day experiences of any track in NASCAR. Each year, the 2.5-mile long superspeedway hosts the Daytona 500 in February, another NASCAR race around the 4th of July, and the Rolex 24 endurance race in January. The Daytona Rising project at Daytona International Speedway (DIS) in Florida broke ground last summer. The $400 million renovation aims to upgrade the front stretch grandstand’s exterior appearance and improve fan experience on race days. The new grandstand will feature 11 football field sized “neighborhoods” that will allow fans to socialize and interact with one another during the race without missing any of the action.  DIS is working closely with design-builder Barton Mallow to ensure the three-year project runs smoothly and does not interfere with any race preparation or activities.

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  • Date occured Thursday, 15 May 2014
Monday, 30 December 2013 11:30

Florida SunRail Phase 1 Almost Completed

Phase 1 of the Central Florida SunRail project is almost finished and service on the route will begin once all 12 stations are completed.  Construction began on the 32-mile route connecting Volusia County to Orlando in January 2012.  The rail line is expected to cost $615 million to construct and $432 million to buy the right of way and tracks.  The federal government, the state of Florida, and the three counties that the rail line passes through are financing SunRail.  The federal government is paying for half of the project through a federal transit “New Starts” grant, and the state of Florida and the counties will each par for 25% of the project.  SunRail was originally approved in July 2007, and it took over four years to plan the route and receive funding.  This period included a six-month freeze on all contracts and a legislative review ordered by Florida Governor Rick Scott.